transparent gif

 

Ej inloggad.

Göteborgs universitets publikationer

Alveolar bone loss in osteoporosis: a loaded and cellular affair?

Författare och institution:
Grethe Jonasson (Institutionen för odontologi); M. Rythen (-)
Publicerad i:
Clinical Cosmetic and Investigational Dentistry, 8 s. 95-103
ISSN:
1179-1357
Publikationstyp:
Artikel, refereegranskad vetenskaplig
Publiceringsår:
2016
Språk:
engelska
Fulltextlänk:
Sammanfattning (abstract):
Maxillary and mandibular bone mirror skeletal bone conditions. Bone remodeling happens at endosteal surfaces where the osteoclasts and osteoblasts are situated. More surfaces means more cells and remodeling. The bone turnover rate in the mandibular alveolar process is probably the fastest in the body; thus, the first signs of osteoporosis may be revealed here. Hormones, osteoporosis, and aging influence the alveolar process and the skeletal bones similarly, but differences in loading between loaded, half-loaded, and unloaded bones are important to consider. Bone mass is redistributed from one location to another where strength is needed. A sparse trabeculation in the mandibular premolar region (large intertrabecular spaces and thin trabeculae) is a reliable sign of osteopenia and a high skeletal fracture risk. Having dense trabeculation (small intertrabecular spaces and well-mineralized trabeculae) is generally advantageous to the individual because of the low fracture risk, but may imply some problems for the clinician.
Ämne (baseras på Högskoleverkets indelning av forskningsämnen):
MEDICIN OCH HÄLSOVETENSKAP ->
Klinisk medicin ->
Odontologi
Nyckelord:
bone density, bone fracture, human, mandible, radiography, periodontitis, dental panoramic radiographs, mandibular trabecular bone, unloaded, skeletal regions, mineral density, postmenopausal women, periodontal-disease, diagnosing osteoporosis, cardiovascular-disease, replacement therapy, osteodent project, Dentistry, Oral Surgery & Medicine, Dermatology
Postens nummer:
242076
Posten skapad:
2016-09-20 16:06

Visa i Endnote-format

Göteborgs universitet • Tel. 031-786 0000
© Göteborgs universitet 2007