transparent gif


Ej inloggad.

Göteborgs universitets publikationer

The Amygdala as a Neurobiological Target for Ghrelin in Rats: Neuroanatomical, Electrophysiological and Behavioral Evidence

Författare och institution:
Mayte Alvarez-Crespo (Institutionen för neurovetenskap och fysiologi, sektionen för fysiologi); Karolina P Skibicka (Institutionen för neurovetenskap och fysiologi, sektionen för fysiologi); I. Farkas (-); C. S. Molnar (-); Emil Egecioglu (Institutionen för neurovetenskap och fysiologi, sektionen för farmakologi); E. Hrabovszky (-); Z. Liposits (-); Suzanne L. Dickson (Institutionen för neurovetenskap och fysiologi, sektionen för fysiologi)
Publicerad i:
Plos One, 7 ( 10 )
Artikel, refereegranskad vetenskaplig
Sammanfattning (abstract):
Here, we sought to demonstrate that the orexigenic circulating hormone, ghrelin, is able to exert neurobiological effects (including those linked to feeding control) at the level of the amygdala, involving neuroanatomical, electrophysiological and behavioural studies. We found that ghrelin receptors (GHS-R) are densely expressed in several subnuclei of the amygdala, notably in ventrolateral (LaVL) and ventromedial (LaVM) parts of the lateral amygdaloid nucleus. Using whole-cell patch clamp electrophysiology to record from cells in the lateral amygdaloid nucleus, we found that ghrelin reduced the frequency of mEPSCs recorded from large pyramidal-like neurons, an effect that could be blocked by co-application of a ghrelin receptor antagonist. In ad libitum fed rats, intra-amygdala administration of ghrelin produced a large orexigenic response that lasted throughout the 4 hr of testing. Conversely, in hungry, fasted rats ghrelin receptor blockade in the amygdala significantly reduced food intake. Finally, we investigated a possible interaction between ghrelin's effects on feeding control and emotional reactivity exerted at the level of the amygdala. In rats allowed to feed during a 1-hour period between ghrelin injection and anxiety testing (elevated plus maze and open field), intra-amygdala ghrelin had no effect on anxiety-like behavior. By contrast, if the rats were not given access to food during this 1-hour period, a decrease in anxiety-like behavior was observed in both tests. Collectively, these data indicate that the amygdala is a valid target brain area for ghrelin where its neurobiological effects are important for food intake and for the suppression of emotional (anxiety-like) behaviors if food is not available.
Ämne (baseras på Högskoleverkets indelning av forskningsämnen):
Annan naturvetenskap
Postens nummer:
Posten skapad:
2013-01-25 13:48
Posten ändrad:
2013-01-28 15:12

Visa i Endnote-format

Göteborgs universitet • Tel. 031-786 0000
© Göteborgs universitet 2007